Nelson Hills Single Track

Pinned on July 14, 2012 at 8:55 pm by casper

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Nelson Hills Single Track

Nelson Hills single track just south of Las Vegas is a great riding area where the trails go for miles and miles up and down hills. There are many old gold mines and you can even see the Colorado river in the far distance. There are also some great sand sections in addition to traditional rocky terrain of the desert west. Nelson Hills is one of my all time favorite places to ride dirt bikes.

[youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2JyV8Vm5P_Q&w=420&h=315]

Nelson is an old mining town. It has been used in some feature films. Click here for Nelson, NV

From http://en.wikipedia.org/

History

The town was the site of one of the biggest mining booms in state history, in the El Dorado Canyon. Gold and silver were discovered here around 1859.
In its heyday, the area established a reputation for being rough and lawless. During the American Civil War, deserters from both the Union and Confederate armies would wander there, hoping that such an isolated location would be the last place military authorities would look for them.
Nelson’s Landing, about 5 miles (8 km) east of Nelson at the downstream end of Eldorado Canyon, is noted for washing into Lake Mohave in 1974 after a strong downpour in the regional mountains sent the runoff down the channels and produced a flash flood. There are five wide channels that run from the local mountains toward the river. The problem is that they all converge into a small outlet where Nelson’s Landing was. The entire landing and village was destroyed and nine people died when the flood came through the wash. The wall of water and debris was reported as about 40 feet (12 m) high as it reached the river.
Much of Nelson, which was not impacted by the 1974 flood, remains today and is located way up the wash, away from the flood channels. The sparsely populated community consists mainly of privately owned ranch houses, and a river and mining tour business housed in a former Texaco gas station that has been used as a filming location for several feature films, including 3000 Miles to Graceland.
The community was named for Charles Nelson, a prospector who was slain at his mine in 1897 by the Indian killer, Avote.[2]


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